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20th century

Baroque

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Grinblat Romuald

Aitken, Robert

Arnold, Malcolm

Barber, Samuel

Bartók, Béla Viktor János

Beaser, Robert

Bennet, Richard Rodney

Berio, Luciano

Bernstein, Leonard

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Foote, Arthur

Foss, Lukas

Françaix, Jean

Fukushima, Kazuo

Gaubert, Philippe

Gieseking, Walter

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Griffes, Charles Tomlinson

Grinblat, Romuald

Grovlez, Gabriel

Guarnieri, Mozart Camargo

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Yun, Isang

Concerto for Flute and String Orchestra

Concerto for Flute and String Orchestra

By Grinblat Romuald

R. Grinblat: Concerto for Flute and String Orchestra was written in 1970 and premiered by flutist Vilnis Strautiņš, Principal flute of the Latvian National Symphony Orchestra, led by legendary conductor Leonīds Vīgners.
The concerto was composed in a dodecaphonic style. The score of the Flute Concerto has been drawn on graph paper and looks quite extravagant. The 12-tone system of that time seems to match the Grinblat's vivid imagination.

"In his concerto, he serves up a battling and virtuosic flute concerto in four movements and 18 minutes. The word Allegro appears in every movement but these are not really expressions of brisk liveliness - at least not by generally conceived standards. The first movement is eccentric. There’s undoubtedly tension, yes, and certainly a tourney for the flautist in the variety of sounds demanded. The orchestration is often a spidery skein or takes a wrecking ball to whatever gentle expectations I might have harboured from the medium. Again, the music sounds essentially dodecaphonic and the orchestra (here just strings) operates in terms of insect chitters and flickers."
Rob Barnett

Vilnis Strautiņš

Leonīds Vīgners (conductor), Latvian National Symphony orchestra, 1976

1 Allegro

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Vilnis Strautiņš

Leonīds Vīgners (conductor), Latvian National Symphony orchestra, 1976

2 Lento/Allegro

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Vilnis Strautiņš

Leonīds Vīgners (conductor), Latvian National Symphony orchestra, 1976

3 Allegro/Lento

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Vilnis Strautiņš

Leonīds Vīgners (conductor), Latvian National Symphony orchestra, 1976

4 Allegro

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Grinblat Romuald

Romuald Grinblat (1930 – 1995) was a Jewish-Latvian composer who lived in the Soviet Union all his life. Born in Kalinin, Tver oblast in Russia he initially studied music in St. Petersburg (Leningrad). Due to his Jewish origin, he couldn’t get into the Leningrad Conservatory. He moved to Riga where he could study composition at the Latvian Academy of Music (then: Latvian Conservatory) with Ādolfs Ābele.
His earlier period compositions were in the tradition of soviet expressionism, popular around the 1950s. In the 1960s Grinblat composed a piano concerto, in dodecaphonic style, which was premiered by pianist Raimonds Pauls, who would later become a superstar of Latvian popular music (Mariss Jansons fulfilled his longtime dream to perform with this pianist many years later).
Most of the time Grinblat made a living by writing music for theater performances and movies. During the 1950s he composed a ballet ‘’Rigonda’’ which gained broad recognition. Additionally, he avidly continues to study available scores of foreign composers. During the second half of the 1960s, Grinblat had the idea to compose his 4th symphony with separate parts for separate groups of orchestral instruments - alternating strings, winds, and percussion. This symphony was highly appreciated by many of his colleagues, including D. Shostakovich and L. Nono.
Among his most notable compositions - is the Flute Concerto (1970) which was premiered by Vilnis Strautiņš, the Principal flute of the Latvian National Symphony orchestra, and legendary conductor Leonīds Vīgners.
The score of the Flute Concerto has been drawn on graph paper and looks quite extravagant. The 12-tone system of that time seems to match the Grinblat's vivid imagination.
During the late 1970s, Grinblat moved to St. Petersburg where he composed one of the first rock operas in the Soviet Union – ‘’Till Eulenspiegel’’ (Фламандская легенда). During the last years of his life, he worked as an editor in the music publishing house. Overall he composed six symphonies, numerous works for theatre, and movies, as well as various instrumental and chamber music compositions.