This website is using cookies. By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more.

Baroque

Baroque

Classical

Romantic

20th century

21st century

Solo repertoire

Piccolo

Alto flute

Bass flute

Bach Carl Philipp Emanuel

Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel

Bach, Johann Sebastian

Benda, Franz

Blavet, Michel

Boccherini, Luigi

Handel, George Frideric

Leclair, Jean-Marie l'aîné

Marais, Marin

Müthel, Johann Gottfried

Pergolesi, Giovanni Battista

Platti, Giovanni Benedetto

Quantz, Johann Joachim

Telemann, Georg Philipp

Vivaldi, Antonio

Concerto in A minor for flute and keyboard (Wq. 166, H 431)

Concerto in A Major for flute and keyboard (Wq. 168, H 438)

Concerto in A minor for flute and keyboard (Wq. 166, H 431)

Concerto in B-flat Major for flute and keyboard (Wq. 167, H 435)

Concerto in D minor for flute and keyboard (Wq. 22, H 426)

Concerto in G Major for flute and keyboard (Wq. 169, H 445)

Sonata in A minor for flute and continuo (Wq 128, H 555)

Sonata in A minor for flute solo (Wq 132)

Sonata in B-flat Major for flute and continuo (Wq 125, H 552)

Sonata in B-flat Major for flute and harpsichord (Wq 161/2 H.578)

Sonata in B-flat Major for flute and harpsichord (Wq. 130, H 560)

Sonata in B-flat Major for flute and harpsicord (H 543)

Sonata in C Major for flute and harpsicord (Wq. 87, H 515)

Sonata in C Major for flute and obbligato harpsichord (Wq. 149, H574

Sonata in D Major for flute and continuo (Wq 126, H 553)

Sonata in D Major for flute and continuo (Wq 129, H 556)

Sonata in D Major for flute and harpsichord (Wq. 131, H 561)

Sonata in D Major for flute and harpsicord (Wq. 83, H 505)

Sonata in E Major for flute and harpsicord (Wq. 84, H 506)

Sonata in E minor for flute and continuo (Wq 124, H 551)

Sonata in G Major for flute and continuo (Wq 123, H 550)

Sonata in G Major for flute and continuo (Wq 127, H 554)

Sonata in G Major for flute and harpsichord (Wq. 133, H 564)

Sonata in G Major for flute and harpsicord (Wq 134, H 548)

Sonata in G Major for flute and harpsicord (Wq. 85, H 508)

Sonata in G Major for flute and harpsicord (Wq. 86, H 509)

Sonata in G minor for flute and harpsicord (Bwv 1020, H 542.5)

Concerto in A minor for flute and keyboard (Wq. 166, H 431)

By Bach Carl Philipp Emanuel

C.P.E. Bach: Concerto for flute in A minor (Wq 166, H 431) is considered as an arrangement from harpsicord concerto which was written in 1750, at the time when Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach served as a court harpsichordist for Prussian King Friedrich II who played flute. 

The concerto is scored for solo flute, strings, and continuo (usually harpsichord). It consists of three movements and displays the composer's innovative approach to form and his ability to blend elements of the Baroque style with emerging Classical characteristics. 

Emmanuel Pahud

Kammerakadamie Potsdam, Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord), 2016. Warner Classics

1. Allegro assai

00:00
YouTube icon

Emmanuel Pahud

Kammerakadamie Potsdam, Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord), 2016. Warner Classics

2. Andante

00:00
YouTube icon

Emmanuel Pahud

Kammerakadamie Potsdam, Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord), 2016. Warner Classics

3. Allegro assai

00:00
YouTube icon

Robert Aitken

CBC Vancouver Orchestra, Mario Bernardi (conductor), 2017, Naxos

1. Allegro assai

00:00
YouTube icon

Robert Aitken

CBC Vancouver Orchestra, Mario Bernardi (conductor), 2017, Naxos

2. Andante

00:00
YouTube icon

Robert Aitken

CBC Vancouver Orchestra, Mario Bernardi (conductor), 2017, Naxos

3. Allegro assai

00:00
YouTube icon

Stephen Preston

Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord), 1981. Deutsche Grammophon

1. Allegro assai

00:00
YouTube icon

Stephen Preston

Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord), 1981. Deutsche Grammophon

2. Andante

00:00
YouTube icon

Stephen Preston

Trevor Pinnock (harpsichord), 1981. Deutsche Grammophon

3. Allegro assai

00:00
YouTube icon

Bach Carl Philipp Emanuel

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788) was a German composer, son of J.S.Bach and godson of G.P.Telemann. C.P.E. Bach’s “sensitive style” (empfindsamer Still) marked a transition between baroque and classical style, applying principles of rhetoric and drama to musical structures. C.P.E. Bach was known as “Berlin Bach” to differenced himself from his brother J.C.Bach who was known as “London Bach”. Besides composing, C.P.E.Bach wrote “Essay on the true art of playing keyboard instruments”, thus greatly influencing upbringing of the greatest classical composers: Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.